New Fund Will Help More Seattle Residents Build Rain Gardens

The RainWise program has expanded in Seattle and now there's a way to get involved without upfront costs to you. Protect local waterways with your home improvements.

Sightline Institute news - RainWise garden Image by Lisa StifflerSeattle’s RainWise rain-garden program is spreading green stormwater solutions across the city, but the rebate program has been out of reach for some homeowners with more modest incomes. While RainWise offers generous reimbursements—$4,600 on average for the installation of rain gardens and cisterns—the homeowner has to pay for the work upfront, and then wait up to two months for the program to pay them back. It’s an expense that not everyone can shoulder. A new financial program called the Green Infrastructure Rebate Advance Fund (GIRAF) should remove that hurdle by bridging the payment gap. A separate access fund will also provide small grants to partially pay for projects near the Duwamish River that cost more than the city’s rebate. RainWise “is definitely an exciting success story,” said Aaron Clark, the driving force behind GIRAF and program manager for the non-profit Stewardship Partners.

New Fund Will Help More Seattle Residents Build Rain Gardens

Primary issue: 

Contact

 
EarthShare Washington | 1402 3rd Ave, Suite 525 | Seattle, WA 98101 | 1.206-622-9840